61. The crisis in the dark matter problem becomes a historically unparalleled failure in the scientific method

This year, Pavel Kroupa was asked to hold a Golden Webinar in Astrophysics on the dark matter problem. This contribution provides the link to the recording of this presentation which has now become available on YouTube. In this presentation, Pavel Kroupa argues that the dark matter problem has developed to become the greatest crisis in the history of science, ever. This contribution also provides links to recordings available on YouTube of previous related talks by the same speaker from 2010 (the Dark Matter Debate with Simon White in Bonn) and 2013 (in Heidelberg). This might allow some insight into how the debate and the research field have developed over the past dozen or more years.

1) Golden Webinar: “From Belief to Realism and Beauty: Given the Non-Existence of Dark Matter, how do I navigate amongst the Stars and between Galaxies?”

On April 9th, 2021, Prof. Pavel Kroupa presented a talk in the Golden Webinars in Astrophysics series on “From Belief to Realism and Beauty: Given the Non-Existence of Dark Matter, how do I navigate amongst the Stars and between Galaxies?”. The talk is now available on Youtube:

The slides to the talk without the fictitious story can be downloaded here:

If you are interested in other talks presented during The Golden Webinars in Astrophysics series, you can find the record of those already presented on their Youtube Channel, and here is a list of upcoming talks. The Golden Webinars are provided as a free public service and have no registration fees.

2) The vast polar structures around the Milky Way and Andromeda

In November 2013, Prof. Pavel Kroupa presented “The vast polar structures around the Milky Way and Andromeda” in the Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium. In the talk he discussed the failures of the Standard model of cosmology and the implications for fundamental physics.

A blog entry from 2012 on the vast polar structure (VPOS) of satellite objects around the Milky Way can be found here.

3) Bethe-Kolloquium “Dark Matter: A Debate”

In November 2010, Prof. Simon White (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Prof. Pavel Kroupa (University of Bonn) debated on the concept and existence of dark matter during the Bethe Colloquium in Bonn. Their presentations and the subsequent debate are available here:

a) Presentations by Prof. White and Prof. Kroupa

Summary of both presentations:

b) The Debate

The German-language television channel 3sat produced a TV report on the Bethe Colloquium, which can be also found on Youtube (available only in German):

Part I

Part II


In The Dark Matter Crisis by Moritz Haslbauer, Marcel Pawlowski and Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

60. Recent review talks about MOND, the Hubble tension and MOND cosmology including major problems of the dark matter models to match data

1) To obtain an introduction to MOND and MOND-cosmology, those interested might like to watch the talk below by Dr. Indranil Banik (past AvH Fellow in the SPODYR group at Bonn University, now at St.Andrews University). It was held on Sept. 30th, 2021 at the University of Southampton.

Indranil Banik

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wJvYvpDWDtDk0xs47H6-Dr0Lr987wf5m/view?usp=sharing

Also, the following two previous talks are relevant:

2) In the recent Newton 1665 physics seminar series on  “MOND, the KBC void and the Hubble tension” by Dr. Indranil Banik and Moritz Haslbauer (SPODYR group):

Moritz Haslbauer

3) And also recently, as a CosmoStat Journal Club seminar on “El Gordo: a massive blow to LCDM cosmology” by Dr. Indranil Banik and Elena Asencio (SPODYR group): 

Elena Asencio


In The Dark Matter Crisis by Moritz Haslbauer, Marcel Pawlowski and Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

59. Are “darker psychological mechanisms” at work ?

(by Pavel Kroupa)

Two related essays have been published by aeon :

1) David Merritt wrote an essay for aeon with the title “A non-Standard model”. It is a very short version of his prize-winning Cambridge Universe Press book “A philosophical approach to MOND” and addresses the problem the cosmological scientist is faced with when needing to reach a conclusion as to the merit of a theory, given the data

Note that “true prediction” is used throughout this text to mean a prediction of some phenomenon before observations have been performed. Today, many numerical cosmologists and an increasing number of astrophysicists appear to be using a redefinition of “prediction” as simply being an adjusted calculation. Thus, the modern scientists observes data, then calculates what the cosmological model would give, adjusts the calculation to agree with the data, and then publishes this as a model prediction.

On the one hand side there is the standard dark matter based model which never made a successful true prediction (in the sense of pre-data) but is believed widely in the community to be true,

while on the other hand side Milgromian dynamics has made many successful true predictions of new phenomena but is deplored by the community.

David concludes this essay with “But I hope that scientists and educators can begin creating an environment in which the next generation of cosmologists will feel comfortable exploring alternative theories of cosmology.”

In addition to the performance of a model in terms of true predictions, a model can also be judged in terms of its capability to be consistent with data. This is a line of approach of model-testing followed by me and collaborators, and essentially applies the straight-forward concept that a model is ruled out if it is significantly falsified by data. Rigor of the falsification can be tested for using very different independent tests (e.g. as already applied in Kroupa et al. 2010). We have been covering this extensively in this blog. For example, the existence of dark matter particles is falsified by applying the Chandrasekhar dynamical friction test (as explained in Kroupa 2012 and Kroupa 2015): Satellite galaxies slow down and sink to the centre of their primary galaxy because of dynamical friction on the dark matter haloes. This test has been applied by Angus et al. (2011) demonstrating lack of evidence for the slow down. The motions of the galaxies in the nearby galaxy group M81 likewise show no evidence of dynamical friction (Oehm et al. 2017). Most recently, the detailed investigation of how rapidly galactic bars rotate again disproves their slow-down by dynamical friction on the dark matter halos of their hosting galaxies, in addition to the dark-matter based models having a completely incompatible fraction of disk galaxies with bars in comparison to the observed galaxies (Roshan et al. 2021a; Roshan et al. 2021b). All these tests show dark matter to not exist. Completely unrelated and different tests based on the larger-scale matter distribution and high-redshift galaxy clusters have been performed in great detail by, respectively, Haslbauer et al. (2020) and Asencio et al. (2021). Again, each of these individually falsify the standard dark-matter based models with more than five sigma confidence.

In summary: (a) By applying the formalisms of the philosophy of science to the problem whether the dark-matter-based models or the Milgromian models are the better theories in terms of their track record in true predictions, David Merritt demonstrates the latter to be far superior. (b) By applying the model-falsification approach by calculating the significance of how the models mismatch the data, we have come to the exact same conclusion.

As alluded to by David Merritt, the frightening aspect of our times is that the vast majority of cosmological scientists seem either not capable or willing to understand this. The lectures given by the leaders of cosmological physics, as can be witnessed in the Golden Webinars in Astrophysics series, collate an excellent documentation of the current disastrous state of affairs in this community. In my Golden Webinar in Astrophysics I describe, on April 9th 2021, this situation as

the greatest scientific crisis in history ever,

because never before have there been so many ivy-league educated researchers who en masse are so completely off the track by being convinced that a wrong theory (in this case dark matter cosmology) is correct while at the same time ignoring the success of another theory (in this case Milgromian dynamics). At next-to-all institutions, students appear to be indoctrinated by the “accepted” approach, with not few students in my lectures being surprised that the data appear to tell a different story. Many students even come to class believing that elliptical galaxies are the dominant type of galaxy, thus having an entirely wrong image of the Universe in their heads than what is truly out there. Once before there was a great clash of ideas, famously epitomised by Galileo Galilei‘s struggle with the Church. But this was very different, because traditional religious beliefs collided with modern scientific notions. Today, the Great Crisis is within the scientific community, whereby scientists ought to be following the evidence rather than belief. Belief should not even be a word used by scientists, as it implies a non-factual, not logical approach. Rather than belief, we as scientists need to objectively test hypotheses which need to be clearly stated and the results of the tests must be documented in terms of significance levels.

2) And the reader of this blog would probably also be interested in the very related earlier aeon essay by myself on Has dogma derailed the scientific search for dark matter?.


In The Dark Matter Crisis by Moritz Haslbauer, Marcel Pawlowski and Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

56. From Belief to Realism and Beauty: Given the Non-Existence of Dark Matter, how do I navigate amongst the Stars and between Galaxies?

(by Pavel Kroupa, 4th of April, 2021, 11:11)

Update (April 15th): After receiving some queries, the slides to the talk w/o the fictitious story can be downloaded here

On April 9th, 2021, I will give this public talk:

If interested, you can join the public lecture by registering here.

The talk, held via zoom, is on April 9that 11:00 Chilean Time (CLT = UTC-4),  8am Pacific Daylight Time (PDT = UTC-7),11am Eastern Daylight Time (EDT = UTC-4), 17:00 Central European Summer Time (CEST = UTC+2)

The Golden Webinars are provided as a free public service and have no registration fees. They are recorded and made available for later viewing via youtube.


In The Dark Matter Crisis by Moritz Haslbauer, Marcel Pawlowski and Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

55. “A Philosophical Approach to MOND” wins prestigious award

It is with delight we learned today that David Merritt’s book on “A Philosophical Approach to MOND” published by Cambridge University Press won the Prose Award for Excellence in Physical Sciences and Mathematics. Other authors also competing for this price were Peebles and Weinberg. 

I had written a review of this book which can be read here.

Note also that in 2013 David published a noteworthy text book on “Dynamics and Evolution of Galactic Nuclei” (with Princeton Series in Astrophysics).


This is an opportunity to recall how I personally stumbled into this whole problem concerning dark matter (see also this article on Aeon): My research up until the mid1990s was based on stellar populations, although in Heidelberg we had also measured, for the first time, the actual space velocity of the Magellanic Clouds (in 1994 and 1997). These were my first endeavours into the extragalactic arena. I had heard a fabulous lecture by Simon White who was visiting Heidelberg, showing movies of structure formation in the LCDM model they had just computed in Garching. I personally congratulated Simon for this most impressive achievement.  One could see how major galaxies were orbited by many dwarf satellite galaxies and how all of that formed as the Universe evolved. I had also noted from photographs that when two gas-rich galaxies interact, they expel tidal arms in which new dwarf galaxies form. These new dwarf galaxies are referred to as tidal dwarf galaxies.

The Tadpole Galaxy recorded with the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. Evident are the new dwarf galaxies in the 100 kpc long tidal tail.

In the 1990’s the community had largely discarded satellite dwarf galaxies being tidal dwarfs because it was known that they cannot have dark matter (this goes back to Barnes & Hernquist,1992,  later confirmed by Wetzstein, Naab & Burkert 2007).  So it was thought that tidal dwarfs just dissolve and play no important role.  The observed satellite galaxies of the Milky Way have large dynamical M/L ratios, going up to 1000 or more. This proved they can contain a 1000 times more mass in dark matter than in stars and gas. So obviously they cannot be tidal dwarfs. I very clearly remember Donald Lynden-Bell exclaiming in Cambridge, when I was still visiting regularly, that his suggestion that the satellites came from a broken-up galaxy cannot thus be correct, since they contain dark matter. Then I made my discovery (truly by pure chance) published in Kroupa (1997), which made me think that what the celebrated experts are telling me seemed not to be quite right. After this publication I was told more than once this work made me un-hireable.
 
I had then noted (Kroupa et al. 2005), that the disk of satellites (DoS, including the newer once which Donald had not known) is in conflict with them being dark-matter substructures, as these ought to be spheroidally distributed around the Milky Way galaxy. 
 
We  argued (to my knowledge for the first time in print, in Kroupa et al. 2010 and in Kroupa 2012 ) that the disk of satellites can only be understood if they are tidal dwarfs. I had also come to the conclusion that my chance discovery above is unlikely to be able to explain the high M/L values of all the satellite galaxies as they would all need to be quite strongly affected by tidal forces which poses a problem for those further than 100 kpc from the Milky Way because their orbital periods begin to approach a Hubble time. And if they are tidal dwarfs (which they must be given they make a disk of satellites),  then this implies we need non-dark-matter models, i.e. , we need to change the law of gravitation to account for the high M/L values these little galaxies display.  Subsequently I was quite fevering (with PhD student Manuel Metz and later Marcel Pawlowski) each time a new satellite was discovered to see where it lay (I used to run to their offices whenever some survey reported a new satellite), and ultimately what the proper motions are doing: if the satellite galaxies form a pronounced disk of satellites then they must be orbiting only within this disk (Pawlowski & Kroupa 2013). I was (this was already in the 2000s) also interested if  John Moffat’s “modified gravity” (MOG) might explain the large M/L ratios, and John Moffat visited me in Bonn. But it turns out that MOG is falsified while Milgromian gravitation (MOND) is, as far as one can tell, the at the moment only possible gravitational theory we can use which accounts for all data and tests so far performed.  Oliver Mueller, Marcel Pawlowski  et al. (2021) affirm that the Milky Way is not unique in having a disk of satellites system. Observing disks of satellites around larger galaxies is not a “look elsewhere effect” since the very-nearest large galaxies are looked at, rather than finding such DoSs around some host galaxy in a very large ensemble of observed galaxies. I think the disk-of-satellites or satellite-plane problem is the clearest-cut evidence why we do not have dark matter. 
 
The (negative) test for the existence of dark matter particles (warm, cold, fuzzy) via Chandrasekhar dynamical friction is the other (Kroupa 2015).
 
Plus, with all the other tests performed in strong collaboration with Indranil Banik (notably Haslbauer et al.  2019a, Haslbauer et al. 2019b,  Haslbauer et al. 2020 and Asencio et al. 2021) it materialises that the tests all lead to mutually highly consistent results – we do not have the situation that one test is positive (for dark matter), the other not. They all turn out to be consistently negative. Indranil Banik concludes correctly (Feb.5th, 2021): “There are so many lines of evidence that no single one is critical any more.”
 
I am personally deeply impressed how everything seems to fall into place (quite nearly everything) once one uses MOND (which is based on a Lagrangian etc.).  Apart from completely naturally resolving the Hubble Tension and easily accounting for massive high-redshift galaxy clusters like El Gordo (see also this account on Triton Station), the DoSs or satellite planes form naturally (as shown independently by Banik et al. 2018 and by Bilek et al. 2018) and these tidal tail dwarf galaxies have large M/L values due to the correct law of gravitation (e.g. this amazing prediction by McGaugh 2016 of the velocities of stars in one of the satellite galaxies and verification thereof by Caldwell et al. 2017).
 
But, just like with the standard model of particle physics, there definitely is a deeper layer to MOND which we have not yet discovered; a more fundamental theory, which may well be the quantum vacuum which also explains particle masses. Milgrom had already published seminally on this issue.
 
The huge success of MOND comes not only in it naturally account for the data on scales of a few 100 pc to a Gpc, but also that it is a “progressive research programme“, with the standard dark-matter based models being “degenerative“.  For details, see David Merritt’s book above. 
 

In The Dark Matter Crisis by Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

52. Solving both crises in cosmology: the KBC-void and the Hubble-Tension

(by Moritz Haslbauer, 20th Nov. 2020, 18:00)

A directly-related presentation by Moritz Haslbauer and Indranil Banik on the KBC-void and the Hubble tension in the ΛCDM model and Milgromian dynamics can found on the Youtube Channel “Cosmology Talks” by Shaun Hotchkiss: Maybe Milgromian gravity solves the Hubble tension!? – The KBC void & νHDM model (Haslbauer & Banik)

The Universe evolves through expansion and gravitation of matter, which leads to some regions having more galaxies and others having fewer. These variations directly reflect the way in which gravity has created structures out of initial density fluctuations over the last 14 billion years. Thus, the observed spatial arrangement of galaxies on scales ranging from 100 kpc to a Gpc is a very powerful test of different cosmological models and gravitational theories.

In our paper “The KBC void and Hubble tension contradict ΛCDM on a Gpc scale − Milgromian dynamics as a possible solution” (Moritz Haslbauer, Indranil Banik, Pavel Kroupa 2020), we tested if the observed spatial arrangement of galaxies on a Gpc scale can be explained by the standard model (Lambda-Cold Dark Matter, ΛCDM) of cosmology. We also tested if a Milgromian dynamics (MOND) model works.

Several surveys covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum (ranging from radio to X-rays) made an exciting discovery: we are in a Gpc-sized region of the Universe containing far fewer galaxies than ought to be in this volume if ΛCDM were correct.

For example, Karachentsev 2012 found a significant lack of galaxies within a sphere of radius 50 Mpc centered on the Local Group. He reported that the average mass density is a factor of 3-4 lower than predicted by the standard model of cosmology. In 2013, Keenan, Barger, and Cowie discovered that the local Universe is underdense on a much larger scale by counting galaxies at near-infrared wavelengths. They found evidence for an incredibly huge void (hereafter the KBC void) with a density about two times lower than the cosmic mean density and with a radius of about one billion light years (or 300 Mpc). This is about 2% of the distance to the observable Universe’s horizon (about 14 Gpc). The KBC void is shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1. The KBC void: the actual density of normal matter divided by the mean cosmological density is plotted in dependence of the distance from the position of the Sun (which is in the Local Group of galaxies). The grey area indicates the density fluctuations allowed by the ΛCDM model. Taken from fig. 1 in Kroupa (2015).

The results by KBC are striking because the ΛCDM model predicts root-mean-square (rms) density fluctuations of only 0.032, while the observed value is 0.46 with an uncertainty of 0.06. This drew our attention, so we decided to investigate the local matter field further in both the ΛCDM and MOND paradigms.

First, we started to quantify the likelihood of a KBC-like void in the ΛCDM model. Using one of the largest cosmological ΛCDM simulations (called MXXL), we rigorously confirmed our suspicion: Einsteinian/Newtonian gravity is simply too weak to form such deep and extended underdensities like the KBC void. Our calculations showed that the KBC void alone falsifies ΛCDM with a significance much higher than the typical threshold used to claim a discovery, e.g. with the famous Higgs boson. Consequently, the KBC void is totally inconsistent with the current standard model, implying that the observed Universe is much more structured and organized than predicted by ΛCDM. A similar conclusion was reached by Peebles & Nusser 2010 on much smaller scales by studying the galaxy distribution within the Local Volume, a sphere with 8 Mpc radius centred on the Local Group. And the whole Local Group is also “grievously” structured (Pawlowski, Kroupa, Jerjen 2013), showing a “frightening symmetry” as called by Pavel Kroupa.

The implications of the observed local density contrast on a Gpc scale are far-reaching, because so far it was widely understood that the ΛCDM paradigm provides a very successful description on this scale. Given the many failures of ΛCDM on galaxy scales (e.g. Kormendy et al. 2010 , Kroupa et al. 2010, Kroupa 2012, Kroupa 2015, Pawlowski et al. 2015), the ΛCDM model now faces significant problems across all astronomical scales. A compilation of failures, many of which have reached the 5sigma confidence threshold of ΛCDM failure, can be found in the previous contribution to the Dark Matter Crisis.

The observed spatial arrangement of galaxies on scales ranging from 100 kpc (the satellite planes) to 300 Mpc (our work) strongly suggests that structure formation is much more efficient than possible by Newton’s gravitational law, implying a long-range enhancement to gravity over that allowed by Newtonian gravity. This is in fact not surprising, given that Newton and Einstein both only had Solar System data at their disposal to formulate their theories; gravitation is after all, the least understood of the fundamental interactions. Consequently, we next studied the formation of structures in Milgromian dynamics, which was developed by Israeli physicist Mordehai Milgrom in 1983 (Milgrom 1983). MOND is a corrected version of Newtonian gravitation taking into account galaxy data which were non-existing for Newton and for Einstein. MOND successfully predicted many galaxy scaling relations, but has rarely been applied to cosmological scales.

We extrapolated the MOND model from galactic to a Gpc scale by applying the Angus 2009 cosmological MOND model. This Angus cosmological model has a standard expansion history, primordial abundances of light elements, and fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), mainly because both the ΛCDM and MOND cosmology have the same mass-energy budget. However, instead of cold dark matter particles, the MOND model assumes fast-moving collisionless matter, most plausibly in the form of 11eV/c^2 sterile neutrinos. The existence of sterile neutrinos is motivated by particle physics, since they could explain why the ordinary neutrinos have mass. The low mass of hypothetical sterile neutrinos means they would clump on large scales (e.g. galaxy clusters), but not in galaxies, thus leaving their rotation curves unaffected. The following is in fact a most important point to emphasize: The Angus cosmological model needs extra fast moving matter which comes from standard particle physics (but still needs to be verified experimentally). This is very different to the ΛCDM model which needs dark matter particles that account for the observed rotation curves in disk galaxies but which are not motivated to exist by the standard model of particle physics.

The enhanced growth of structure in Milgromian gravitation generates much larger and deeper voids than in Einsteinian/Newtonian gravity. This leads to the formation of KBC-like voids as shown in our paper. Such an extended and deep underdensity causes an interesting effect: parts of the Universe beyond the void with more galaxies pull galaxies in the void outwards. This changes the motions of galaxies, making the local Universe appear to expand faster than it actually is. The situation is illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Illustration of the Universe’s large scale structure. The darker regions are voids, and the bright dots represent galaxies. The yellow star represents the position of our Sun. Note that the Sun is not at the centre of the KBC void. The arrows show how gravity from surrounding denser regions pulls outwards on galaxies in a void. If we were living in such a void, the Universe would appear to expand faster locally than it does on average. This could explain the Hubble tension. Interestingly, a large local void is evident in the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Credit: Technology Review

Indeed, local observations of how quickly the Universe is expanding exceed the prediction of ΛCDM by about 9%. This so-called Hubble tension is one of the greatest mysteries in contemporary cosmology. In our paper we showed that the unexpectedly high locally measured Hubble constant is just a logical consequence of enhanced structure formation in MOND, and us residing within a particularly deep and large void. This Hubble bubble scenario is however not consistent with ΛCDM because it does not allow for a sufficiently extreme void (Figure 3).

Figure 3: In our paper we showed that that the KBC void cannot form out of the initial conditions of the CMB at redshift z = 1100 if Einsteinian/Newtonian gravity is assumed. Adding the speculative cold dark matter does not help. Therefore, the Hubble tension cannot be explained by the KBC void in the context of the ΛCDM paradigm. Consequently, we aimed to study the formation of structures in Milgromian dynamics. The long-range enhancement to gravity in MOND allows the formation of KBC-like voids, which simultaneously explains the high locally measured Hubble constant.

Thus, the current hot debate among astronomers about the expansion of the Universe being different close to us than far away only exists because astronomers are using the wrong model. A universe which does not have exotic cold dark matter particles but runs on Milgromian gravitation ends up looking just like the real Universe, at least with the tests done thus far.

There is now a real prospect of obtaining a MOND theory of cosmology that explains the data from dwarf galaxies up to the largest structures in the Universe much better than the ΛCDM framework. Consequently, the here described cosmological MOND framework could be a way out of the current crisis in cosmology.

Given my affiliation with Charles University, I have been travelling to Prague and beyond frequently and now the CORONA Pandemic has stopped this flying about the planet — I have already written about the first wave and my getting marooned on a beautiful island next to the Strand. Being this time stranded in Bonn without a Strand during the second wave, I have a little more time on my hands I guess. So here we are, back to the Crisis.

In The Dark Matter Crisis by Moritz Haslbauer, Marcel Pawlowski and Pavel Kroupa. A listing of contents of all contributions is available here.

46. First Workshop on Progress in Modelling Galaxy Formation and Evolution in Milgromian dynamics — first results achieved with the Phantom of Ramses (PoR) code

[Note: This web-page is being updated continuously:
current status: 26.09.15]

LOCATION and TIME:
Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7550, Sept. 21st - 25th 2015

Below are provided
1.BACKGROUND/MOTIVATION
2.HOW TO REGISTER
3.PARTICIPANTS
4.HOTELS
5.PROGRAMME
6.PHANTOM WIKI
ORGANISERS: Benoit Famaey (Strasbourg) and Pavel Kroupa (Bonn)

1.BACKGROUND / MOTIVATION: Galaxy-scale data seem to be in accordance with the hypothesis that the extrapolation of Newtonian gravitation by orders of magnitude below the Solar system space-time curvature breaks down completely, and that collisionless astronomical systems behave according to space-time scale-invariant dynamics, as postulated by Mordehai Milgrom (2015). The classical theories of dynamics and gravitation underlying this symmetry, often referred to as MOND  theories, show a richer dynamical behaviour with new phenomena which appear non-intuitive to a Newtonian mind. Very successful analytical results have been obtained in this dynamics framework, such as accounting for the hitherto not understood properties of polar-ring galaxies (Lueghausen et al. 2013), accounting for the Bullet cluster (Angus, Fmaey & Zhao 2006Angus & McGaugh 2008) and the properties of disk galaxies (MOND reviews by Scarpa 2006; Famaey & McGaugh 2012;Trippe 2014) and elliptical galaxies (Sanders 2000; Milgrom & Sanders 2003; Scarpa 2006).

But little understanding of the dynamical behaviour of live Milgromian systems has been gathered. Live calculations, i.e. simulations of galaxies, are required in order to test, to possibly refine or to falsify this approach. The implications for fundamental physics are major in any case!

A series of Milgromian-dynamics workshops is planned to begin remedying this situation.

With this first “Phantom of Ramses” (PoR) meeting, the aim is to bring together the pioneers who have been daring footsteps into applying Milgromian dynamics to simulate live galaxies. First simulations of galaxies within MOND have been achieved with the first Milgromian Nbody code without gas (Brada & Milgrom 1999). Tiret & Combes (2007) re-visited this problem with their own code. The PhD thesis of Tiret is available here (in French). For spheroidal geometries MOND simulations have become possible with the NMODY code by Nipoti, Londrillo & Ciotti (2007), see e.g. the application of this code to the phase-transition of spheroidal systems on radial orbits (Wu & Kroupa 2013). A MOND code has also been developed for studies of cosmological structure formation by Ilinares, Knebe & Zhao (2008). While being highly successful in their ability to represent observed galaxies, all of these attempts have died-off due to a lack of long-term sustainability.

Now much more involved and more numerous studies has become possible with the first publicly available Milgromian dynamics computer code including star formation, i.e. baryonic physics (Lueghausen, Famaey & Kroupa 2015) with which even full-scale simulations of cosmological structure formation have become achievable, PoR being an official patch to Teyssier’s RAMSES code. A similar computer code (RAyMOND) has been developed independently by a Chilean research group (Candlish, Smith & Fellhauer 2015).

Because non-linear Milgromian dynamics is largely non-intuitive for researchers trained to think within the framework of linear Newtonian gravitation, this group of pioneers needs to find the chance to discuss, in as great depth as is required, the issues arising with initialising, setting-up and evolving Milgromian galaxies in virial equilibrium, including gas dynamics and star formation. The first scientific results which have already been achieved with the PoR code will be discussed at this occasion, but research related to Milgromian dynamics (e.g. by adoption of zeroth-order approximations by adding dark matter particles to Newtonan systems) will also be discussed.

The meeting will take place at the Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg. We are planning a whole week for this event, whereby there will be one to two (at most three)  presentations per day interrupted with long discussion breaks to dwell upon problems that have been encountered and that may need solutions. Also, the breaks are intended to allow new persons to learn using PoR. The meeting will take place in the *MEETING ROOM* (with a capacity of about 20) at the Observatoire, and the presentations can be of any duration, but must have a break after the first 45 minutes if longer. After the last presentation each day discussions may continue at will, and Strasbourg offers many excellent culinary opportunities for the evening entertainments.

2.HOW TO REGISTER / IF INTERESTED:
Please register by sending an e-mail to Benoit Famaey <benoit.famaey_at_astro.unistra.fr> and to Pavel Kroupa <pavel_at_astro.uni-bonn.de>.

Note that this meeting does not have invited talks. The attendance is limited to 20.
3.PARTICIPANTS (preliminary):

Garry Angus (Brussel, Belgium)
Indranil Banik (St. Andrews, UK)
Christian Boily (Strasbourg, France)
Joerg Dabringhausen (remotely from Concepcion, Chile)
Benoit Famaey (Strasbourg, France) [SOC]
Martin Feix (Paris, France)
Hector Flores (Paris, France)
Alistair Hodson (St. Andrews, UK)
Rodrigo Ibata (Strasbourg, France)
Tereza Jerabkova (Praha, Czech Rep.)
Pavel Kroupa (Bonn, Germany) [SOC]
Fabian Lüghausen (Bonn, em.; tbc)
Marcel Pawlowski (Cleveland, USA)
Florent Renaud (Surrey, UK)
Jean-Babtiste Salomon (Strasbourg, France)
Ingo Thies (Bonn, Germany)
Guillaume Thomas (Strasbourg, France)
Yanbin Yang (Pairs, France)
HongSheng Zhao (St. Andrews, UK)

Conference Photo (24.09.2015):

        PoR_group

Left to right:  Yanbin Yang, Indranil Banik, Ingo Thies, Guillaume Thomas, Garry Angus, Jean-Babtiste Salomon, Tereza Jerabkova, HongSheng Zhao, Rodrigo Ibata, Marcel Pawlowski, Hector Flores, Alistair Hodson, Florent Renaud, Benoit Famaey, Fabian Lueghausen, Pavel Kroupa
4.HOTELS:

Hotel Esplanade
ETC Hotel
Hotel Roses
Hotel21
Au Cerf d’Or
des Princes
5.PROGRAME:
The programme, abstracts and list of participants are available here as a pdf file:
PoR_Programme.pdf


PROGRAM (with downloadable presentations):  

First Workshop on Progress in Modelling Galaxy Formation and Evolution in Milgromian dynamics —
first results achieved with the Phantom of Ramses (PoR) code.
At the Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, 21.09.-25.09.2015.

PoR-code talks are scheduled for the afternoons allowing for discussion and learning time.  A few scientific talks relevant to the mass-deficit problem are scheduled for the mornings.


******* Sunday, 20th September

evening, approximately 18:00-
Meet for drink and food at Au Brasseur
ACCUEIL
******* Monday, 21st September 10:00 MORNING COFFEE 10:30 Welcome/Introduction/First presentation and discussion: Setting the scene: 1. Kroupa_PoR.pdf: Why is the dark-matter approach ill-fated? (Pavel Kroupa) 2. Famaey.pdf: The basics of Milgromian dynamics/MOND (Benoit Famaey) LUNCH (12:15-14:45) 15:00-16:15 1. Lueghausen_PoR.pdf: The PoR code (Fabian Lueghausen) 2. Thies_PoR.pdf: Setting up a stable disc galaxy in PoR (Ingo Thies) 16:30 AFTERNOON TEA 17:00-18:00  Open Discussion ******* Tuesday, 22nd September 10:00 MORNING COFFEE 10:45-11:15 (30 minutes) Angus_PoR.pdf: The DiskMass Survey’s implications for MOND, CDM and itself  (Garry Angus) LUNCH (12:15-14:45)   14:45-15:15 (30 minutes) Banik.pdf: The External Field Effect In QUMOND: Application To Tidal Streams (Indranil Banik) 16:10 AFTERNOON TEA 16:30 Thomas_PoR.pdf: Simulating Tidal Streams with PoR (Guillaume Thomas) PoR Movie (dSph Sgr, slide 19 in presentation): YouTubelink 17:00-18:00  Open Discussion - decision to set up PhantomWIKI ******* Wednesday, 23rd September 10:00 MORNING COFFEE 10:45-11:15 Yang_PoR.pdf: (30 minutes) Reproducing properties of MW dSphs as descendants of DM-free TDGs (Yanbin Yang) MEETING PHOTO  (12:15) LUNCH (12:20-14:45) 14:15-14:45 Angus2_PoR.pdf: The sub-subhalo connection to M31’s plane of satellites (Garry Angus) 14:45-15:15 Pawlowski_PoR.pdf: (30 minutes) Small-scale problems of cosmology and how modified dynamics might address them (Marcel Pawlowski) 16:00 AFTERNOON TEA 16:30 Renaud_PoR.pdf: Gravitation-triggered star formation in interacting galaxies (Florent Renaud) 17:30-18:00  Open Discussion 18:30--  Workshop dinner at Au Brasseur
ACCUEIL
******* Thursday, 24th September 10:30 MORNING COFFEE 10:45-11:15 Hodson_PoR.pdf: (30 minutes)  EMOND (Extended MOND) and effective galaxy cluster masses (Alistair Hodson) 11:30-12:00 Preliminary results on QMOND forces between point masses (HongSheng Zhao) LUNCH (12:15-14:45) 14:45-15:15  Salomon_PoR.pdf: The tangential motion of the Andromeda System (Jean-Babtiste Salomon) 15:15-15:45 Dabringhausen_PoR.pdf: Early-type galaxies in Milgromian dynamics (Joerg Dabringhausen, remotely from Concepcion, Chile) 16:15 AFTERNOON TEA 16:45-17:15 Banik2_PoR.pdf: Evidence for Dynamical Heating in The Local Group (Indranil Banik) 17:15-18:00  Open Discussion ******* Friday, 25th September 10:00 MORNING COFFEE 10:30-12:00 Kroupa_IMF_Strasbrourg.pdf Main Seminar of the Observatory: Is the stellar IMF a probability distribution function, or is star formation highly regulated? (Pavel Kroupa) LUNCH (12:15-14:45) 15:00 Final discussion and FAREWELL
6.PHANTOM WIKI

PhantomWIKI
This wiki is dedicated to supporting the research making use of the “Phantom of RAMSES” (PoR) patch.